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the chairmen write a budget that balances that would make this economy much better. and i thank the chair and will yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the clerk will report the amendments that are in order en bloc. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposed amendments en bloc for mrs. murray, amendment number 433 for mr. hatch amendment number 297, for ms. stabenow amendment number 432, for mr. grassley amendment number 156, for ms. mikulski amendment number 431, for ms. ayotte amendment number 158, for mr. cruz amendment number 202, for mrs. murray amendment numbered 439, for mr. crapo amendment numbered 222, for mrs. she haoepb amendment -- shihan amendment number 438. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: mr. president, i want all of our members to understand that the second amendment that we will be voting on tonight is the ryan budget. there seems to be some resistance among my republican colleagues in bringing up the house republican budget for a vote, and it's pretty easy to see why that is. last year's house repu
corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
economy and you look at the industrial revolution and the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by technology which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being in a constant feedback loop to the ability to trade stock in non-of seconds. millennials or at the forefront of that. we understand that is reality so other generations are running around saying how do we adapt then how do we move? how do we go forward in this fast-paced world and millennials are taking it all in stride because that is the reality of how we grow. it's also brought us a sense of ease and adaptability. it's brought us the ability to be resilient in the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year could be totally different. we saw how quickly it started and we can see how quickl
of the gridlock and dysfunction here in washington, d.c. they can see that our economy is slowly getting back on its feet, businesses are beginning to hire more workers, but my constituents and people across the country are very frustrated that the constant political crises are holding our recovery back right when we need to be doing everything possible to support it. after two years of debate about fiscal and economic policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisa
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
that shifts the fundamentals of our economy. the industrial revolution and introduction of the changes in society are powered by the exponential technology that changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant feedback account millennials are the forefront of that. how we move forward in this fast-paced world the millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we go out and also it's brought us a sense of easing adaptability. it's brought us to be resilient in the economic crisis that has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year it can be totally different because we saw how quickly it started and how quickly it might go away. there's a sense of optimism and social mindedness which i think came out of line 11 which is in the minds of a lot of this generation seeing our country in that momen
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
these kind of revolution that shifts fundamentals of our economy. you look at the industry evolution, the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by exponential technology, which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things, to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant -- in a constant feedback loop. the ability to trade stocks in nanoseconds. so, millenials are at the forefront of that. we understand that as reality. so, other generations are running around saying, how do we adapt? good forward any fast-paced world. the millenials are taking it all in stride because that's the reality of how we agree up, and also brought the sense of ease and adaptability and the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis, which, wow, has led to incredible youth unemployment, and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see in one year it could be totally different. we saw how quickly it
by foreign media organizations. i think there are two main concerns. first, whether the chinese economy will continue to grow sustainably. and secondly, whether a stronger china will become more assertive, and even -- [inaudible] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i think these two concerns are really necessary. china is capable of achieving sustainable and a healthy economic development, in pursuing social progress. and that are more than 1.3 billion people in this country so we are on a long journey towards modernization. for that we would require an international environment of lasting peace. even if china becomes stronger, we will not seek edge me. because we have learned from our own experience in the modern period that one should not impose on others what he himself does not desire. this is an article of faith for us. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: let me underscore here that china has an unwavering commitment to peaceful development. we also have an unshakable determination to safeguard our country's sovereignty and terri
, it impacts our economy in a very significantly negative way. all we have to do is look across the atlantic at europe and what's happening there to get a glimpse of the crisis that can come from not dealing with ever-increasing debt and not taking steps necessary over a period of time to put your country on a fiscal path to health. now, i think most of us know here that we have to make some tough choices and it's going to require political will in order for us to address this. we've been avoiding this for years. expoo we're going to face a debt-induced catastrophe if we don't address it and drean addrt soon. so when you're faced with this kind of fiscal mess, what do you do? well, what families and pise businesses all across america have had to do when they face these types of situations is sit down, create a budget, put themselves back on a path to balance and to prosperity on and to avoid the inevitable, a collapse of the family budget or the business budget. our communities and states have had to do this, and we see this happening everywhere except in washington. it is this body and this
. this will trigger profound changes in our economy and society. it needs to be supported by integrated reforms in many different areas. we need to overcome the problems that might crop up in the course of urbanization. i know that according to the statistics currently available, there are about 500 suggestions and proposals, about urbanization made during the npc and cbbc seat session. we were you all of them very carefully and pursue urbanization in a steady, acted and a prudent way. [speaking chineseway. >> nowadays, food safety has become very, very serious issue. we can see the sky in beijing this weekend. is it possible for the chinese development, to solve this problem while maintaining the speed of economic development? and will it give more space for chinese people to monitor this issue? thank you. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i said earlier that we want to fully upgrade the chinese economy. that's also includes that in the course of development we will do our best to make sure that our people can breathe
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
anything you hear you like you want people to hear about, it's pound just economy. so on your cell phones, on your iphones, on your computers, something you hear, something you think that's important, a speech, something from a speech, hash tag just economy. and, c-span, thank you for being here. america, hash tag just economy. [laughter] all right. so it gives me great pleasure -- i'm sorry, my name is john taylor, i'm the president and ceo of the national community reinvestment can coalition. i probably didn't want to say after i did all that tweeter/twitter stuff -- [laughter] but that's who i am. and a great honor to introduce our incoming chair, bob dickerson, from the birmingham business center. and i want to welcome him to introduce our keynote speaker, a good friend of the national community reinvestment coalition, richard cordray. so, please, join me in welcoming bob dickerson. [applause] >> thank you, john. good morning. >> morning. >> so, you know, it used to be rude to have your cell phones out during a meeting, but now since we're all tweeting -- [laughter] using that hash ta
requirement to have a -- growth perspective of employers. mr. deputy speaker, a vital sector for our economy and the cost of doing business is energy. creating a low carbon economy is done by create jobs rather than -- was a major step forward for new nuclear. today with help of we are also announcing our intelligence to take two projects to the next stage of development will support the manufacture of mission vessels in britain with new takes incentive and the honorable members has urged do you passionately and in a nonpartisan way about the damage of doing the famous ceramic industry and persuaded me we will exempt from next year the industrial processes for the industry and others from the climate change. [cheering and applause] [laughter] >> for the we will this year sign contracts for the commissioning relief, the expectations of which is already increasing investment. i want britain to tap to new sources of local energy like shale gas. i'm introducing a tax -- including a shale gas field allowance to promote early investment. shale gas is part of the future and we'll make it happen. we
industry is a more efficient supplier of funds to the real economy than banks. it is simply less costly to sell bonds, notes and commercial paper to investors than to borrow from a bank. finish since the mid 1980s by intermediating these transactions, the securities industry has supplied 15 times more financing to the real economy than banking. and it has done so without government prudential regulation. when the financial crisis came, lightly-regulated investment bank withs like bear stearns, lehman brothers and merrill lynch did no worse than heavily-regulated fdic-insured commercial banks like wachovia, washington mutual and indy mac. so it's hard to see that more and titled regulation is really the answer. what we are watching in the name of prudential regulation is the government gradually squeezing the life out of the banking industry the way the interstate commerce commission gradually squeezed the life out of the railroads. if we let the government insure and provide prudential regulation to the securities business as some regulators have now proposed, we'll pay a heavy price in
in three months and that would be the major comptroller of european all legal and economy. they would expose the company is about how the standard oe executives for supporting the nazis piece of meat headlines and lead to congressional investigations. the columnists would benefit by getting a lot of juicy items. in his letters he details how he met with landrieu pearson and he exchanged these items and bragged that he became so close to drew pearson in particular that he became regarded as one of the family. in his role as a propagandist, dahl started to make a name for himself in washington and his short stories started earning him quite a bit of a claim as a young writer and one of them and particular, sort of particularly affecting the young fable that he wrote for children and was published in the ladies' home journal was about a little gremlins that tinkered with the ref pilot planes to arouse sympathy for the british ref pilots. a particularly appealed to eleanor roosevelt who read the story to her grandchildren and in short order invited to the white house for dinner eleanor ro
just a continuation of the same slump that had been afflicting the british economy since the end of the first world war. so they saw a situation in which the fruits of science and progress were not benefiting science concern society as a whole, and they concluded that the rational organization of science and society was the only way to change that. the other important factor was that scientists had far more international context than almost any other segment of society at this time. and so far sooner than most were very aware of the terrible evils of nazi germany beginning with the persecution and dismissal of all jewish scientists from german universities in 1933. blackett himself was involved as many of these british and american scientists were during this period in finding positions for refugee jewish scientists from germany in universities in britain and america. but i think their politics was far less important than their or brilliance, their commitment and their true fearlessness. the scientists in britain and america who would be involved in this effort included no fewer
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
to the economy generally to gun control. you know, just on gun control there's been a lot of things that have been happening over just even the past few weeks. i was in colorado a couple weeks ago, and it's the first time i've kind of heard of a white house getting involved in the passage of state legislation where the big news when i was there was, apparently, vice president joe biden had just been calling up members of the state legislature there kind of lobbying them, saying that if they voted the right way, the president would help campaign for them this next year, and if they voted the wrong way, they may end up facing primary opponents. and according to legislators i talked to there, there was about seven democrats who had switched their votes enough to get four gun control bills through the statehouse. so there's a lot of things tar happening right now. -- that are happening right now. but what i'd like to try to start off with is the general issue of health care, because i think we've had the best health care system in the world, and i'm just going to briefly go through some of the ch
similar philosophy and economic programs created a thriving state economy where 1.4 million new net jobs were added during his time in office. there are other fundamentally important issues where the two men match. stemming the rise of health care, school choice, and as i'm sure we'll hear this morning, addressing the issues involving immigration that affecting -- that affect all of us. issues that continue to resonate as important topics in the our lives, ones in which governor bush has demonstrated much-needed leadership today. it is for these and many other reasons that jeb bush stands a as the only republican governor in the history of the state of florida to be reelected to office. he hails from a family that has gone out of their way to extend warmth and support to mrs. reagan, and all of us at the reagan library over the years. let us extend that warmth to him. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming governor jeb bush. [applause] >> very kind. really honored to be here. [applause] whoo, thank you. thank you all so much. ambassador, great seeing you. thank you so much. it
see the economy take off mr. mr. norquist? >> guest: okay, we haven't had trillion dollars spending cuts that we had an agreement by the president of the united states forced on them by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars, so 100 million a year. they haven't started yet and they're just beginning to kick in. this a quest or is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decades to what the republicans want in the state battle we had in 2011, the budget control act was obama needs the debt ceiling to be increased because we spent so much money and republican said okay, we will raise the debt ceiling so the country doesn't default but only if you agree to a dollar for dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. that $2.5 trillion in spending restraints, not real cuts, spending, less than obama had hoped but in washington that is called a cut. if you want 10 of something and you only got eight of something, you walked away with eight but so that was the $2.5 trillion spending reduction over the next decade. it hasn't happened yet. we have sever
people, but the economy, that was a glimpse of the kinds of effects that you could create with a cyberattack. that is why it has our attention. >> that is why individual industries, and given the potential, had preemptive action today. >> senator, i think that this set some standards and goals. we have identified the correct relationships between commercial and private and government. .. i presume that you are seeing huge pressures as naval forces are withdrawn because of budget pressures, but also can you comment on the role of coast guard because even though it's not the jurisdiction i present a place of very large role, too. if the idb to push its in your al because that will degrade. >> i think i plan to grow on their life in that part of the world. we are ensuring that they hip and shoulder to shoulder. as you say with a secret regime, i occupy a seat that is before suitable combatant commanders. we didn't get much that we get just about zero now if sequestration stands. what that translates to his last year we get 150 to 200 tons of cocaine on the high seas, coast gu
in a positive and constructive way to our economy and yield all sorts of innovation we can't even imagine right now, but it's probably going to be narrower slices. >> host: and we'll go back to todd shields of bloomberg news for more questions. >> thanks. on the unlicensed, it's an interesting concept. you mentioned needing big, powerful transmitters across big areas, but, of course, there's an alternative vision which is have a lot of smaller shrubbery, if you will. i'll work on the analogy more later, where we would have a lot of small wi-fi hot spots that would carry people's internet traffic. and i think that's some of what was behind the report you mentioned earlier about nationwide free service. now, whether anybody could build a network that thick and extensive and actually make it you pick bytously useful, i imagine, is another question. but there is a debate going on that you'll get to weigh in on which is when you design the auctions, how much of the airwaves should be devoted to these free, unlicensed uses versus should it be carpet remnant, or should it be a little bigger a chunk? t
of big blocks of spectrum, and it's destructive in a positive and constructive way in the economy and yield innovation that we can't even imagine right now, but narrower slices in smaller areas. >> host: back to tom shield of bloomberg news for more questions. >> thank you. it's an interesting con cement, you mentioned the big powerful transmitters to cover big blocks in big areas, but there's an al -- alternative vision, use smaller shrubbery to make it work where we have a lot of small wifi hot spots capable of carrying internet traffic, and these days, it's some of what was behind the report you mentioned earlier by nationwide free service, and whether anybody builds a network that thick and extensive is another question. there is the debate going on that you'll get to weigh in on which is when you design the auctions, how much of the air waves should be devoted to the unlicensed uses versus should it be carpet remnants or a bigger chunk? to the extent you devote those unclinessed uses, it's not sold to at&t, verizon, t-mobil, whoever are the competitors. a little bit of unlice
will we see the economy take off, mr. norquist? >> guest: okay. we haven't had a trillion dollar in spending cuts what we had was an agreement by the president of the united states forced on him by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars. so that's $100 billion a year. and those cuts haven't started happening yet. they're just beginning to kick in. the sequester is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decade. so what the republicans won in that big battle we had in 2011, the budget control act, was that obama wanted to keep spending, and he needed the debt ceiling to be increased because he'd spent so much money. and the republicans said, okay, we'll raise the debt ceiling is so the country doesn't default, but only if you agree to a dollar-for-dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. and so we got $2.5 trillion in spending restraint. not real cuts, spending less than obama had hoped in. in washington that's called a cut. if you wanted ten of something and you only got eight of something, you go i got cut too. actually, you walked a
america's case on a daily basis because he would be's with the economy. so one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state because she knew she could do that for him on a daily basis around the world. that's why i think that she would bring to him accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward in terms of agreement, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him the -- what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decision. libya being one of them, and asia definitely. >> host: we'll get to libya next. a very interesting scenario and what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 and she spoke there and she said farflung destinations from the chronic where she would be traveling, that issue would come up as the first, second, or third issue, and it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusing on this far-flung destination, and once we saw wikilea
have the most developed set of economies in western europe that exist and the relationship across the atlantic constitutes nearly one third of world trade. that is why european investment in the u.s. is around eight times that of investment in india and china put together. this basis of its enormous significasignifica nce in today u.s. investment in the e.u. is three times higher than in all of asia so it speaks for itself the potential that exists there. that transatlantic relationship defines the shape of the global economy as well. so it either the e.u. or the u.s. is the largest trade and investment partner from most all of the countries in the global economy that speaks of the centralitcentralit y of the power and the potential for is fair. that is why i am happy from an irish perspective to see the high-level report produced between the e. u. and the u.s. in terms of potential has received a very positive response. i spoke to the president after his re-election and he addressed this matter in his state of the union address and last week the european council gave the theory p
-- there is some younger prince who tries to open up a bit and revive the economy. the risk of that is, it produces a backlash among the conservatives who don't want more change and openness and opportunity for women, which they see as the road to ruin if you're like my friend, lulu. and if you got a religious backlash come you could obviously have the quote modernizers, and that does not mean westernized. modernizers. react to that backlash. the third is getting a leader who decides that the way to control this is to revert to the excessive religiosity of the '80s and '90s, after the attack on the mecca mosque in 1979, the saudi king basically turned the country over to the religious fundamentalists. and 20 years of that bread of the terrorists that produced 911. so saudis understand that, but, and say that it could happen again, but it, it's hard to entirely rule out. the fourth option is obviously some kind of chaos that leads to collapse, sparked by something like in tunisia like the young man burning himself to death. saudis are very passive, but they also, young people at least, increasingly
democracy. it will soon be one of the world's largest economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and increase foreign direct investment, reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all live in the is ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. since asia's economy is largely based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms, to liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is out in the anchors itself in the asia-pacific region, and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.-india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve. it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the vat is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with ind
, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential to the prediction of weather, navigation in all forms of transportation, the operation of power grids, the completion of local and global financial transactions and communication to mobile platforms whether they be on land, sea or air. commercial satellite industry also plays a critical role in supporting government operations. commercial satellites supply the majority of communications in afghanistan and iraq. today our satellites are still flying almost all of the dod's unmanned aerial vehicles, and we're providing the vast majority of the navy's communications at sea. to address the challenges that i mentioned earlier, the leading space operation, operators have gotten together on a number of complex cooperative projects, probably the most significant of these is the space data association or sda. the formation o
housing his tour economy. some estimate housing and related interest trees are rewording 25% of our economy. until the street of housing, our broader economy will not fully recover. this is a command is a important issue to all of us. i applaud bipartisan efforts on this committee with mr. campbell and mr. peters, mr. miller and ms. mccarthy in hopeless hearings to focus on related ideas. i look forward to hearing more today about your three-part strategic plan to build company pain and contract the gses. in your efforts for a single platform and standardize part says, i believe it's a great step forward, a great development. i also believe that your efforts to maintain foreclosure prevention activities and credit availability at refinance mortgages has been successful. i also want to applaud the work with harrop, the home affordable refinance program to promote prevention at today's has had successes. one by one blade refinances have been done which nearly equals the number of subway finances the prior three years. the focus on underwater mortgages is greater than 105 want to value
economy. that is not a fair competition. they troy and new york are two different questions but interestingly, middle size cities have also used creativity, innovation, their position change and detroit is beginning to look at the digital age and beginning to find that they too can get innovative companies taking over with the auto industry, midsized cities have their own attractions, many of the most attractive cities to live in, one reason cities are powerful as people love living in cities. they come to them and go to the most creative, entrepreneurial inventive people go to the most attractive cities and a lot of those cities of between five hundred thousand and 1 million and that attract very creative innovators who can solve problems so there are definitely issues between big cities and small cities that we need to deal with the also some strength. finally the french case that was mentioned over here, yes, french mayors are not elected, they are appointed as part of a political system. he was not such a successful president. and mentioned france was holland was a succe
on too long and have all do like men to my room for manage my economy? not just africa but south asia, latin america, i was in bangladesh i saw the devastating impact of the flooding of a cyclone it had put hundreds of miles of fields that the crops would not grow. i saw what adaptation means you have to have new ways to grow water involved or very dry conditions. this is expensive and difficult. of course, if you undermine people with their livelihood of food security it is a huge gender dimension. it is women primarily to have to put food on the table. that is a pattern that is so impact fall it goes on for years but we have not heard as much about it but they did not know it was caused by the carbon emissions from elsewhere so webern not talking about it but they talk about it when we went there but this was the worst human rights problem but then i read the science and realized that only of big human-rights problem but there was a foundation in ireland of climate justice that stars with injustice those that are these responsible. it is beginning to affect there is said disconnect
in america. high schooler alan shimp of pennsylvania won first prize her his industry on the economy and spending. and a group from knoxville won first prize with their documentary on public transportation. watch the winning videos each day next month on c-span and see all the documentaries at student cam.org. >> "the communicators" winds up its visit to ces international 2013, the consumer electronics show in las vegas, with a look at several booths to see some of the technology that's being unveiled this year. >> host: and now joining us on "the communicators" is henry massey of the venom corporation. mr. massey -- >> guest: hello. >> host: -- what is it that venom makes? >> guest: well, we actually are producing a product here called data guard. it's a scooter product for your mobile twice. now, the idea of data guard is it makes an encrypted link between your mobile device and the internet which stops people grabbing your wi-fi connection and grabbing your data sent over the wi-fi connection. it's a really big danger with mobile devices when they're used on open wi-fi networks, p
, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during that session as well if you're interested in hearing what it was like to be part of that process from
. in some cases, the only one. people seem unaware. everyone is aware that the economy is kind of lacking. but obama has already been able to make the argument that we are turning the corner and we can do what we can. people don't believe that there is suppression for people your age or my page today. that group has not regained a single job since the recession ended. do not blame obama for the crisis. look at what happened since june 2009. there are fewer of us working today than there were in 1997. in all of the jobs being recovered are being taken by people 55 years old and older. i can find exactly one story at least recognizes the job recoveries. but the fact that young people have an opportunity today and are not finding jobs and not moving ahead, that was missed during the election. there is no reason why we should have been the only ones just yet. >> this is the author of spin masters. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here is our primetime lineup for tonight. up next, fiona deans hallora profiles thomas nast. the one asso
's economy and national security. the electric power industry is susceptible to geomagnetic light induced currents which can overload unprotected power grids and result in widespread power outages. in the spacecraft industry, intense geomagnetic storms have the capacity to disrupt normal operation such as satellite communication, and, of course, they pose risks to astronauts in space. in addition, space weather can cause irregular areas in the signals from our very important global positioning systems. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, or noaa is the official source for space weather prediction for the nation. several of nasa's research satellites have become essential part of our nation's space weather prediction system providing very important data for determined to space weather conditions. one such mission is the advanced composition explorer which sits in the solar wind ahead of the earth providing early warning of incoming solar storms. finally, orbital debris is the last space threat i will address today. the joint space operations center managed by the u.s. stra
cable subscribers and others, based on what you see, is the u.s. economy growing at a faster clip than last year? what they did you get? >> the big shock for us, of be were oblivious to those kinds of questions in which many countries and housing stopped 2008 than subscriber losses were bigger. they said while. we never really appreciated for new homes in america the way we fight to over the same pie. greasy a little bit of hope but also post but the recipients between the cable business locally and nbc universal and cable channels nationally and locally. so now the advertising business is very relevant. and to greasy everyone feeling a the same thing. >> but with the, a sense of nervousness, we kid go down but like they said in tough times, take your risk. in good times it is easier for people to spend money. it was a tough decision to buy new and six in the middle of a recession but. >> now you are in control dealing with hollywood types what is more complicated? regulators in washington? [laughter] >> mass you can answer the question. [laughter] there is day but to be with the talen
in south africa now, building a whole new economy and a whole new government down there. we could certainly even use them in places like haiti, if they'd let us in. but i find this to be a wonderful idea that i think president clinton could give some moral and political encouragement to. >> when did you write your first syndicated column? >> first syndicated column was on april 17, 1984. >> how do you remember that date? >> i remember because it was very significant. it was a great opportunity and blessing and achievement for me. it was kind of the fruition of something that i had always wanted to do, not necessarily the syndicated column, because that was sort of dumped in my lap, but this kind of national expression or platform. and i still remember the column. it was called "the children of divorce," and it came out of a personal experience, which is what i like to write about the most when i can. i was sitting across the aisle on an airplane from a little girl who was clutching a cabbage patch doll and crying, and the country being what it is, i didn't want to go over there and comfort
this in the capitalist political economy of the united states and indeed they sought and united with those engaged in systemic change in international political economic arrangements. the black panther party fought for a domestic and a global socialist system committed to the kinds of things that everybody cares about, equality, justice and human rights. from where josh and i said, this is the historical truth. fighting for revolutionary change is extremely difficult. it's often very very messy and the history of politics of the party confirms these particular positions. but when we go to a dominant historical narrative, the dominant popular cultural narratives that shape how many and perhaps most americans think about the party, you run into a barrage of misinformation and misinterpretation. and it's imperative that we understand that and as josh was sort of laying out, the official vilification, the official denigration and how that folds over into history and popular culture. so in popular understanding for example among a lot of people, the black panther party with this older black radicalism
of office or demanded his resignation as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war, a very young george washington was writing very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally fairfax, a very attractive, older, sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters had become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? much as petraeus with' e-mails became public. and what if we got rid of george washington? so neither -- bill clinton's not the first and not the worst, petraeus is not the first and not the worst. been there, done that, there's a long history of it. in fact, it pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. now, there's -- the details on it are sketchy. this is not a lot of letters written about this, but here is what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua speed, and speed was perhaps as dashing and as handsome and as, i guess, quote-unquote lucky with the ladies as lincoln was allegedly homely and awkw
-- as the economy turned decisively south by something bill gates and warren buffet decided to do with the giving pledge. the giving pledge is interesting because it worked largely, the two men worked largely with the "forbes" 200 list in the beginning and the goal was to get people to pledge, in forming an illegal character of the pledge, to give away half their fortunes for the purposes of making the world a better place to live, and, basically, that meant philanthropy. well, it got a lot of press at the time, and the "forbes" 400 editors paid a fair amount of attention to it, and in the years sense, the three or four years sense then, the number of people who have embraced signed in effect the pledge has grown to somewhere less than a hundred , but it's grown up, and it is a significant phenomena. for my purposes, what was wonderful, the one thing to do if you signed the pledge now was provide a brief description of your thoughts on wealth and philanthropy so it was part of the giving pledge website so here is a whole bunch of material about very rich individuals, how they felt about their mon
the world and make america's case on a daily basis because he was going to be busy at home with the economy. so there was a very clear reason why he -- one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state, because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all around the world. and that's why i think that she would bring to him an accurate reading of where things stood, what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, in terms of agreement, in terms of where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him, you know, what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles, but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them and asia, definitely. >> host: uh-huh, and we'll get to libya next, actually, i find that a -- it was a or very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli/palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 when hillary clinton spoke at the conference, and she mentioned at the time something that i thought was interesting. she said that far-flung
the stay of the economy. and as things get better, we will love the congress, the media, the president better as well. other thicks involved as far as congress that's a good case. this congress and the last congress has been less productive than any congress i can remember. if you want to pull out that, good, i think the polls reflect the outcome. on media, there are things that are happening. not only in the future but the past now at least since cable news, fox of '96, cnn was '81. that was the idea we factionize. we had three choices. we were watching the same thing. they were competing with others but they were giving us a centrist view of the world. suddenly when you could break it down to the units and the units were going to be on 2 hours a day and cheaper to hire somebody to hold forth each evening, you started to obviously divide the media but also divide the audience. and you see that too. so it's to take a lot of work to put the audience back together. it was very productive financially to separate it. i think that's happening as well. >> hello, i'm also a student american u
of the lower costs, including economy, shift into medicaid, the number of patients, issues like that. and i would ask if questions are submitted by the members, that you respond properly as you have in the past. with that the subcommittee is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] >> the head of the federal finance agency will testify on housing issues, including government mortgage financing by fannie mae and freddie mac. live coverage starts at 10 a.m. on c-span3. later in the days ahead of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the recent release of more than 2000 illegal immigrants from detention centers. lastly john morton testified the releases were done for budgetary reasons. live coverage begins with the house judiciary committee at 1 p.m. eastern also on c-span3. >> thirty-four years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by joerg television provider. >> next, former and current obama administratio
. after i do a marco rubio here. [laughter] [laughter] the war has effected the economy as well, and left us with a legacy of high oil prices and higher national debt. and the iraq war -- has far reaching consequences. i have been speaking up until now about budgetary cost, of course there are vast costs to civil society both here and iraq and economic costs and financial costs. some of the costs that i'm now going talk about are costs that are born by individuals and society or society at large rather than directly by the government. the first -- there are many of these costs i can talk about. let me highlight a couple. first, if we think back to when we invaded iraq in 2003, oil prices were $25 a barrel and we had been at that level for more than two decades, and the futures market, which take in to account already increase from demand of china predicted oil prices would remain in that range for the next decade. oil prices are complicated but most experts agree that iraq was one of the triggers that lead to oil prices shooting up shortly after the innovation. oil prices peaked at $14 0
to make sure that we're growing our economy and that we're strengthening our middle class. and as i said at my state of the unigallon address last month, every day we should be asking ourselves three questions. one, how do we make sure america's a magnet for good jobs. number two, how do we quip people with the skills they need to get those jobs and, number three, how do we make sure that hard work actually pays off in a decent living. these are the challenges that i've instructed my team here at the white house and in my entire cabinet to focus on. and a position that's instrumental to tackling these challenges is having an outstanding secretary of labor. so i want to begin by thanking hilda solis and her entire team. [applause] including acting secretary harris. [applause] for the outstanding work that they've been doing over the past four years. their efforts at the department of labor have given more young people a chance to we were new skills, more returning vets the chance to find a job, they've looked out for worker safety from construction sites to coal mines, they've stood up fo
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